Maymester Abroad/Off-Campus
2014 Summer Sessions at Vanderbilt
Summer Sessions

FOR SUMMER 2014, VANDERBILT IS OFFERING EXCITING MAYMESTERS AND SUMMER COURSES ABROAD.

 

Maymesters offer innovative and intensive academic experiences. Maymesters, whether on- or off-campus, allow students to explore topics often only available in summer and in ways that go beyond the traditional classroom setting. For many students, participating in Maymester becomes an adventure in learning.

Students interested in applying to one of the following courses must do so before JANUARY 31st. All application material, including the essay, recommendation letters and $50 GEO application fee should be submitted by January 30th.

Once students have been accepted into a Maymester course and by February 14, 2014, they will confirm their acceptance by signing a virtual “Commitment to Attend.” This commitment will appear on the student’s GEO application once she or he has been accepted into the Maymester:

Commitment to Attend
For students who have been accepted into the Maymester of their choice we will require a virtual “Commitment to Attend.” By signing this document the accepted student:

  1. Commits to attend the program.
  2. Is permitted to withdraw their commitment to the Maymester, if GEO is notified before March 13, 2014). And,

Students are strongly encouraged to sign this document within 14 days of notification of acceptance, preferably before Feb. 14th. This deadline is necessary in order to accommodate waitlisted students into any vacancies that may occur in the course roster.

Maymester Withdrawal Policy

By clicking on the "Commit" button, you agree to:

  1. Commit to attend the program.
  2. Acknowledge that you will be required to forfeit a $500 deposit fee* if you withdraw from the program after the specified withdrawal deadline (March 14, 2014).

If you fail to sign this document within 14 days of your notification of acceptance, or by February 14, 2014, your position may be made available to waitlisted students.

Note: The deposit fee will be assessed directly to your Student Accounts invoice, and will be billed on June 1. The deposit fee applies only to those who withdraw after the specified deadline. Those who withdraw before the deadline will not be assessed the fee. Students with demonstrated financial need who have applied for the Global Summer Fellows (GSF) scholarship may withdraw without penalty after the deadline in the event that they do not secure GSF funds, provided they do so within one week of being notified of their GSF status.

*For withdrawals after April 14, 2014, Vanderbilt reserves the right to bill students for any unrecoverable costs, even if these costs amount to more than the $500 base withdrawal fee.

Why does Vanderbilt University charge a deposit fee? In order to plan our programs effectively, we need an accurate count of participants as early as is possible. Students who back out of a program after having committed may jeopardize both the planning and the pricing of the program. We impose a monetary penalty on those who back out as a way of ensuring that we count only those who are serious about attending.

For questions related to any of the Maymesters listed, please consult the professor for the course. You may also consul t with Dr. Marti n Rapisarda, A&S Dean for Summer Sessions, 311 Kirkland Hall , and with the GEO staff in the Student Life Center for additional information.

Vanderbilt will again provide on a competitive basis scholarships to help undergraduate students pay the costs of studying abroad during the summer , including the Maymesters listed above. The Global Summer Fellows Program will provide university stipends that can be used to offset the costs for students enrolling in Vanderbilt-approved, credit­bearing summer study and Maymester programs. These are competitive awards based on the student's essay , major, letters of reference and are linked to a student's financial need vis-a-vis the Maymester costs.

Summer Study Abroad Financial Aid
Maymester and on- line scholarship applications are available here and additional information can be found at
https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/?go=funding.

Please note: Under-enrolled courses may be cancelled. Students who have applied to such courses will be notified at the earliest opportunity. Students who have financial holds or are on social or academic probation are ineligible for Maymesters. Acceptance into a Maymester is contingent on the instructor's approval, too.

FYI: THE JANUARY 31st DEADLINE IS ONLY FOR OFF-CAMPUS AND ABROAD MAYMESTERS. ON-LINE COURSE REGISTRATION FOR ON-CAMPUS MAYMESTER AND SUMMER COURSES WILL BE HELD FROM MARCH 25-MAY 6.


 

ASIAN STUDIES 236: Inside China: Society, Business, and Culture in Beijing and Shanghai

PROFESSOR: XIANMIN LIU, SENIOR LECTURER IN ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM

China is one of the world’s most dynamic countries, a powerhouse at the center of the global economy. But what is China like behind all the hype and the headlines? This program is designed to provide students with unique insider’s introduction to China’s economy, society, and culture through classroom instruction and real life interaction. Students will attend seminars on China’s history and current events and learn basic conversational Chinese skills at one of Beijing’s prestigious universities. The program also includes multiple trips to a wide variety of famous historical sites and institutions where students will have the opportunity to interview individuals from many different walks of life, including entrepreneurs, teachers, doctors of traditional Chinese medicine, migrant workers, martial arts experts, and performers.

The program will spend approximately two weeks in China’s capital, Beijing and one week in China’s financial center and the largest city, Shanghai.

No background in Chinese is required.  

This curriculum consists of the following components:

Beijing

1) Topical Seminars
Students will attend seminars (in English) given by Chinese and American scholars on diverse topics, including current Chinese society, politics, economy, environment, and US-China relations. Students will also have the opportunity to engage in discussions about these issues with Chinese college/graduate students.

2) Field trips & interviews
Field trips will be arranged for students to visit a range of well-known cultural/historical sites, such as the Great Wall, Temple of Heaven, Forbidden City, Tibetan lama Temple, and Tiananmen Square. Students will also have opportunities to visit local businesses, a school, a traditional Chinese hospital, a rural community, as well as private homes. In addition, students will have the opportunity to gain “up close and personal” insights into Chinese life through interviews with government employees, business owners, doctors, school teachers, migrant workers, Tai chi masters, and performers.

3) Language training & language practicum
Students will learn some basic “survival” Chinese language skills in the classroom, and then practice these skills through daily communication and interaction with Chinese people both on and off campus.

Shanghai

The program will spend the last week in Shanghai, which is China’s commercial capital and one of the most phenomenal cities in the world. Activities in Shanghai will include attending lectures on subjects such as China’s globalization and the history of Shanghai. Field trips will include visits to famous sites such as the Bund and Pudong, China's financial and commercial hub. Students will also pay a visit to a joint venture, and chat with Vanderbilt alumni about living and working in Shanghai.

Through this program, students will gain in-depth understanding of contemporary China’s social, cultural, political, and economic environment. Ultimately this program will give students a new perspective on their own role in the growing global community that includes both the United States and the People’s Republic of China.

FEES: Cost per student is $8,700. Included: all field trips, cultural visits, and classes/seminars, guest lectures, Tai chi lesson, shadow puppetry show, acupunctures, high-speed rail from Beijing to Shanghai, maglev train ride, housing/hotel for 3 weeks in Beijing and Shanghai, HTH International Health Insurance, and most meals. (Students will have a meal plan). Not included: airfare (international & national), incidentals, some meals, and personal travel and expenses.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare.

More details here: Maymester in China Schedule.pdf

DATES: May 6-27, 2014.
Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

ELIGIBILITY: No Prerequisites. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. Student should be in good health upon committing to the program.

SYLLABUS: 2014 ASIA 236 Syllabus.pdf

CREDITS: 3 credit hours.  AS 236 counts as an INT credit toward AXLE. 

MORE INFORMATION: Maymester in China presentation.ppt
To view the file "ChinaSlideshow 1.mov," click here
E-mail: xianmin.liu@vanderbilt.edu

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CLASSICAL STUDIES 244: HISTORY AND ART OF ANCIENT ROME

Professor: Max L Goldman, Senior Lecturer of Classical Studies

This course introduces students to the archaeology, history and culture of Ancient Rome through visits to significant archeological sites, monuments and museum collections in Rome and locations throughout southern Italy.  We will learn about the houses, villas, and shops of the cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius along beautiful Campanian coast.  We will explore the city of Rome, where students will be able to experience the many historical layers of the city.  Because we will be getting to many sites in Rome on public transportation, students will, by the end of the course, be able to navigate modern Rome on their own with confidence. 

This course has three specific aims: 1) to provide students with a general knowledge of the topography and history of ancient Rome and the southern Italian plain as well as the most significant monuments and artifacts of the period in question; 2) through investigation of these materials in their original contexts, to help students achieve a better understanding of the daily lives of the Romans; and 3) to develop an appreciation for what the Romans have left us in terms of physical and cultural legacy.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to demonstrate a familiarity with the different art forms in antiquity and their development, a knowledge of the architectural styles and building materials, an understanding of the development of Roman political institutions and how they are represented in the physical fabric of the city, and an appreciation of daily life of the Romans.

DATES: May 5-30, 2014

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. The course is conducted in English.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: January 31, 2013
Students are advised not to purchase their tickets prior to (date to be determined), in the event that the course is cancelled.

FEES: Cost per student is $8,700. Fees include tuition, hotels with buffet breakfast each day, some meals, entrance fees to all museums and parks, and HTH International Health Insurance. Fees do not include: round-trip airfare to and from Rome, extra curricular activities, baggage insurance, weekend meals or personal expenses. A common itinerary will be developed for each student to facilitate group travel.

ITINERARY:  Course meets at the Vesuvian institute on May 8 and ends in Rome on May 31st.  The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the competitive "Global Summer Fellowship Program," which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. CLAS 244 is listed as International Culture (INT) for AXLE credit.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail :  max.l.goldman@Vanderbilt.Edu

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EARTH & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 210: FROM VOLCANOES TO RAINFOREST: GEOLOGY & ECOLOGY IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

ProfessorS: MALU JORGE & GUIL GUALDA, EARTH & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

SCOPE: We will study Earth and Environmental processes and systems in the field. In 2014, the course will be held in Brazil, a country globally known for its natural features, which will give us the opportunity to study a variety of topics in the Earth and Environmental Sciences; time will be evenly split between topics related to ecology and biodiversity in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest and topics related to magmas and volcanic activity in the geological history of South America.

ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION BIOLOGY: The Brazilian Atlantic rainforest goes from North to South along the Brazilian coast. It encompasses more than 50,000 species of animals and plants, a biodiversity similar to that of the Amazon. It is also highly threatened as almost 90% of its area has been converted into crops and cities. In this part of the course, students will learn important aspects of Tropical ecology, biodiversity, conservation and management in direct contact with one of the most diverse and threatened rainforests of the world.

MAGMAS & VOLCANOES: Rocks preserve the most extensive record of the evolution of the planet, from which we are able to retrace Earth’s history over 4.5 billion years. We will study the processes that led to the assembly of South America ~600 million years ago and the opening of the South Atlantic ~140 million years ago, including volcanic activity that led to some of the largest supereruptions on Earth. We will explore how the topography today reflects processes that took place over time and the effects on human occupation and land use.

PROGRAM: The course will start in São Paulo on May 04 and finish in Florianópolis on May 30, 2014. We will be based in 3 main areas in Brazil over the length of the course, and the topical focus will change accordingly:

  1. RIO CLARO (Western São Paulo State): Students will split their time between the departments of Ecology and Geology of Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), where they will visit research labs, attend guest lectures, and develop small research projects with Brazilian students. 
  2. ILHA DO CARDOSO (Southern São Paulo State): We will stay at Ilha do Cardoso State Park, a Nature Reserve at the southern tip of São Paulo State that harbors 150 km2 of protected and pristine rainforest, mangroves and sand beaches.
  3. SERRA GERAL (Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul States): From the coast to the plateau of the Serra Geral, we will explore a sequence of volcanic rocks that record the transition from deserts to a site of major volcanism that culminated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean.

EVALUATION: Course evaluation will be based on participation, field exercises, short project reports, and oral presentations.

REQUISITES: Students with all levels of expertise in geology and biology are encouraged to apply. Activities will be adjusted to take into account prior experience and course-work. EES 210 has no formal prerequisites.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. This course is listed as MNS in AXLE.

FEES: Course fee of approx. $8900 includes tuition, lodging, transportation, occasional meals (depending on location), HTH International Health Insurance, and entrance fees to National and State Parks. It does not include airfare from Nashville to São Paulo or from Florianópolis to Nashville, transportation from and to airports, regular meals in major cities, or incidental expenses.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

DATES: May 4-30.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: For information on the Global Summer Fellowship Program, offering scholarships of up to $8,500, consult GEO: www.vanderbilt.edu/studyabroad.

MORE INFORMATION:
Malu Jorge (malu.jorge@vanderbilt.edu)
Guil Gualda (g.gualda@vanderbilt.edu
http://my.vanderbilt.edu/ees210fieldinvestigations/

 

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ECONOMICS 230: War, plunder and pillage, and other economic conflicts

Instructor: ROBERT DRISKILL, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

Course description

Why would soldiers, such as the well-known guards at Buckingham Palace, be dressed in bright red? Surely it makes them an easy target for the enemy. Economics, though, provides a hypothesis for why uniforms used to be so bright and are now, except in ceremonial units, designed to camouflage the individual soldier. Economics also can explain why the era of castles in the High Middle Ages was actually a time of relative peace.

These are not the usual questions addressed in undergraduate economics classes. There, the topics mostly are about the allocation of scarce resources when property rights are well-defined and protected. This is the way of making a living by production and exchange. But much economic activity concerns another way of making a living—pillaging and plundering and appropriating by force the goods of others. This way of making a living is the subject matter of this course. We will study the sources of negotiation failures that lead to war, the economics of how a principal., e.g., a General, gets his agents, e.g., a soldier, to do his bidding, the economic trade-offs between conscripting soldiers or paying them a market-determined wage, the economics of castles, the economics of strategic bombing, and the economics of financial conflicts.

Understanding of these topics will be reinforced by visits to the Imperial War Museum, the Greenwich Maritime Museum, the Tower of London, the London Eye, Parliament, Churchill’s war rooms, a large international bank, and even a musical like "Billy Elliott."

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students should have taken Econ 100 and 101. We will average four hours each weekday of class work, about one-third of which will be activities and excursions. This should leave at least one long weekend for travel and exploration on one’s own. Grades will be based on a journal kept by each student, class participation, and an exam.

The textbook is Principles of Conflict Economics by Charles H. Anderson and John. R. Carter. Cambridge University Press; ISBN 978-0-521-69865-8, 2009 (paperback).

ELIGIBILITY: Prerequisites: ECON 100 & 101. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

FEES: Cost per student is $9,500. Fees include tuition, accommodation at the Foundation for International Education (FIE) in London, entrance fees to museums and historical sites (and associated transportation costs), occasional group meals, HTH International Health Insurance, and public transportation passes. This fee does NOT include airfare to and from London (which you must purchase and arrange on your own), individual meals, or incidental expenses.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the Global Education Office’s “Global Summer Fellowship Program,” which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at:https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

TENTATIVE PROGRAM SCHEDULE:
Student Arrival: Thursday, May 8
Orientation: Thursday, May 8 – Sunday, May 11(mandatory)
Maymester Classes: Monday, May 12 – Friday, May 30
Student Departure: Saturday, May 31

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. AXLE credit: SBS.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: Robert.a.driskill@gmail.com

 

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ENGLISH 288: Romantic Poetry, Refugee Asylum and Radicalism in the Swiss and French Alps and the French Mediterranean

LECTURER: ROBERT BARSKY, PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH, FRENCH AND ITALIAN

Despite (or perhaps because of) the conservatism of the Swiss and the image of Switzerland as a place of political neutrality, banking and watch-making, the Swiss Alps have sheltered and inspired generations of radical creative and political work, by a host of artists, Romantic poets (i.e. Wordsworth, Shelley and Byron), anarchists (Bakunin, Kropotkin and the Jura Federation), and, in Ascona, an incredible group of visiting artists and writers (Mary Wigman, Hermann Hesse, D.H. Lawrence, Isadora Duncan, C.G.Jung, Franz Kafka, Paul Tillich and Max Weber). 

One reason for this is that the conservative Switzerland is tightly guarded, and ruled in accordance with international legal instruments and laws that have made it a safe haven for persecuted persons, and a fertile ground for international organizations charged with upholding human rights. Another reason is the sheer grandeur and impenetrability of the high Alps has led to the establishment of specific kinds of political regimes that have been largely protected by repeated incursions and allowed for a certain protective neutrality.

In this Maymester, Professor Robert Barsky will make this link between radicalism and creativity, safe haven and international law, medicine and international engagement, by exploring institutes, specialists and natural settings in the Alps of Switzerland, Italy and France. Beginning in Geneva, the students will be introduced to the international legal and non-governmental organizations that uphold international laws, notably the Red Cross, the World Health Organization, the International Organization for Migration, the UN, UNICEF, the ILO, the WTO, Doctors Without Borders, and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees. There, students will meet with high-ranking officials from those organizations, and witness firsthand the kinds of work that is directed from the Geneva offices. 

While based in Geneva, we will also undertake a day trip to Lausanne, where students will also have access to archives of work from political radicals, notably Reclus, Kropotkin and Bakunin, as well as documents relating to Swiss experiments in radical reform, including the work of the Jura watchmakers. The class will then visit Montreux, where they will encounter the worlds of Byron, Mary and Percy Shelley and others through visits to the regions so dear to all of them, including the Chateau Chillon and the Villa Diodati. 

We will then travel to Zurich, where we will stay for 4 days, exploring its remarkable literary and cultural history, before heading to Grindewald, to explore the sublime heights tha have inspired so many artists, writers and philosphers.

We will then move to the area around Ascona, Locarno and Monte Verità, where a remarkable set of radical communities created monumental works. Artists and other famous people attracted to this hill included Hermann Hesse, Carl Jung, Erich Maria Remarque, Hugo Ball, Else Lasker-Schüler, Stefan George, Isadora Duncan, Carl Eugen Keel, Paul Klee, Carlo Mense, Arnold Ehret, Rudolf Steiner, Mary Wigman, Max Picard, Ernst Toller, Henry van de Velde, Fanny zu Reventlow, Rudolf Laban, Frieda and Else von Richthofen, Otto Gross, Erich Mühsam, Karl Wilhelm Diefenbach,Walter Segal, Max Weber, and Gustav Stresemann, and Gustav Nagel.

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all students in good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

FEES: Cost per student is $8,800.00. Fees include tuition, accommodation, most breakfasts, public transportation between sites, and some cultural activities. It does not include regular meals, incidental expenses, and airfare (BNA-Geneva), for which a common itinerary will be developed. 

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Click here for schedule information.

Tentative DATES: May 5, 2014

  • May 5th: Orientation in Geneva
  • May 6-12: Geneva (Sessions with United Nations High Commission for Refugees, the International Organization for Migration, Doctor's without Borders, United Nations, World Trade Organization, United Nations, World Trade Organization, International Labor Organization, International Red Cross, and World Health Organization)
  • May 12th: Travel to Ascona
  • May 14th: Sunday May 20th, Monte Verità, Ticini, Locarno, and the Swiss Alps
  • May 20-27:  Hiking and writing (sublime) poetry at Mont Blanc

TEXTS:
Lord Byron's "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage" http://www.archive.org/stream/childeharoldspi20byrogoog#page/n10/mode/2up
Lord Byron's "Don Juan" http://www.gutenberg.org/files/21700/21700-h/21700-h.htm
William Wordsworth "The Prelude" http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww287.html
David Ellis's Byron in Geneva (2011)
International Migration, international health, and Human Rights Law texts (available online).

Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection, by IRENE E. HOFMANN, Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago

CREDITS: 3. This course is listed as HCA credit in AXLE. English 288 has no prerequisites.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: Robert.barsky@vanderbilt.edu
Website: www.robertbarsky.org
Personal website: www.vanderbilt.edu/french_ital/barsky

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European studies 260:
Origins of Modernism: Vienna from 1750 to the Present

PROFESSOR: CHRISTOPH ZELLER, EUROPEAN STUDIES PROGRAM

Probably no other European capital preserved its former glory with equal attention to detail while transforming the past into a versatile, modern present. Once the center of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Vienna still plays a major role in world politics with its multiple United Nations offices, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Organization of Security and Co-operation in Europe, and many other institutions. A link between west and east, north and south, Vienna has been a market place of diverse cultural ideas and political concepts for centuries. These ideas manifest in the city’s architecture, its events, and particularly its museums, ranging from the world famous Museums of Art History and of Natural History to lesser known, but highly innovative venues such as the House of Music and the Anatomic Collection in the city’s “Fool’s Tower” (its first ‘mental ‘hospital). Students will explore the cultural diversity of Vienna, its European (and Austrian) context, its history, institutions, museums, and monuments. Trips to Budapest and to the nearby Alps will complete this Maymester in the heart of Europe.

TEXTBOOK:

  • Nicholas Parsons, Vienna: A Cultural and Literary History, Oxford: Signal Books, 2008
  • Philipp Blom, To Have and to Hold: An Intimate History of Collectors and Collecting, Woodstock, NY 2002 (excerpts).

The textbook reading has to be done before arrival in Vienna. The time in Vienna is set aside for conceptual and on-site learning, immersion and the development of the individual research project

PARTICIPATION:

Meetings, trips, field studies, and events are mandatory. Your active participation in discussions will be counted with 20% towards the total grade in this course.

TEST:
There will be a test on students’ pre-departure reading

ASSIGNMENTS AND PRESENTATIONS:
Students will submit a short written essay (one to two pages, double-spaced, 12p, Times New Roman, 1’ margins) and present their findings to the group.

  • Assignment 1: Districts
    Students will explore one neighborhood and present their findings. Presentation includes the introduction of characteristics and landmarks of one of Vienna’s neighborhoods along with a brief historical and demographic overview.
  • Assignment 2: Architecture and Art
    Students will examine a building (including its history and its creator), a style of architecture and art, an aesthetic period, a specific artwork, or a musical performance.
  • Assignment 3:  People and Culture
    Students will focus on one of their daily experiences during their trip to Vienna and explain an exemplary event or occurrence from a personal, culturally comparative perspective.

FINAL ESSAYS:
Final essays (8-10 pages, double-spaced, 12p, Times New Roman, 1’ margins) are due on June 7. Students will be given a topic during before the beginning of the third week in Vienna.

EVALUATION:

Participation

Test

Assignments

Paper

20%

20%

30%

30%

FEES: Cost per student is $8,100. Fees include course tuition, transportation and housing for course-related travel and lodging in Italy, HTH International Health Insurance, entrance fees to sites and museums, and three group meals. Fees do not include airfare to and from Vienna (students will arrange and purchase their own air travel), most meals, or personal expenses, including calls and texts made on rented cell phones. Suggested spending money for the 4-week period is $800-1,200, depending on personal spending habits and travel on free weekends.Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

ITINERARY:The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

For information about the Global Summer Fellowship Program, offering scholarships to about 25 to 30 students at levels up to $8,500. Consult the Global Education Office (GEO) at www.vanderbilt.edu/studyabroad.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours; EUS 260 01 will count as an INT course toward AXLE.

SYLLABUS: Vienna Syllabus 2014.pdf

DATES: May 6-28, 2014

MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY:
Contact Prof. Christoph Zeller for a complete itinerary & for further information: christoph.zeller@vanderbilt.edu
Additional course information at www.vanderbilt.edu/german/studyabroad
Apply through the Global Education Office website for the Global Summer Fellowship: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad

 

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POLITICAL SCIENCE 223: EUROPEAN POLITICAL ECONOMY & ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS

Instructor: KLINT ALEXANDER

Join Professor Klint Alexander for a unique Maymester opportunity to study, travel and learn about the inner-workings of important international economic institutions in London, Brussels, Geneva and Paris. European Political Economy & Economic Institutions: A London Maymester is designed to (1) broaden the student’s knowledge of how the global political economy works and (2) observe firsthand the policy-making processes of key economic institutions that influence the global economy. The course will be offered in the heart of the government district in London and cover a number of timely topics, including international financial regulatory reform, the status and prospects of the Doha Round of WTO trade negotiations, the fallout of the EU/Greek economic crisis, and more. Students will visit and observe the inner-workings of the EU in Brussels, the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Geneva, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris, and the Bank of England in London. These visits will give students a chance to network with international officials and explore internship and job opportunities for the future. Successful completion of the course will count towards Axle requirements and the major in Political Science.

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.
FEES: Cost per student is $9,900. Fees include tuition, lodging, transportation in London, Geneva and Brussels, accommodation at the Foundation for International Education (FIE) in London, entrance fees to museums and historical sites (and associated transportation costs), occasional group meals, HTH International Health Insurance, and public transportation passes. This fee does NOT include airfare to and from London (which you must purchase and arrange on your own), individual meals, or incidental expenses.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.
Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the competitive “Global Summer Fellowship Program,” which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

TENTATIVE PROGRAM SCHEDULE:
Student Arrival: Thursday, May 8
Orientation: Thursday, May 8 – Sunday, May 11(mandatory)
Maymester Classes: Monday, May 12 – Friday, May 30
Student Departure: Saturday, May 31

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. PSCI 223 course can be counted toward AXLE credit for SBS.

SYLLABUS:  European_Political_Economy_&_Economic_Institutions_(Maymester_2013).pdf

MORE INFORMATION: e-mail: klint.w.alexander@vanderbilt.edu

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES 294: RELIGION AND CULTURE OF MOROCCO

LECTURER: Sherif Barsoum

RS

Religion and culture are complex phenomena that intersect in a variety of ways; depending on the location, they are historically imbricated in such diverse areas as politics, the arts, education, and social and gender relations. "Religion and Culture of Morocco" is designed to give students an opportunity to explore these connections firsthand in a North African context. The Maymester course encompasses two portions. The first, devoted to in-class lectures and study at Vanderbilt, and the second of which will involve hands-on research and experience in Morocco, supplemented by additional lectures and presentations. The initial in-class component (15 hours) will introduce students to Moroccan history, as well as provide an overview of the religious traditions (Islam, Judaism, and Christianity) that have contributed to the development of Moroccan culture. Once in Morocco, an equivalent amount of lecture time (15 hours) will be used to focus on specific cultural practices and religious institutions, and their wider relationship to contemporary religious, cultural, and political changes in the country.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Construct a chronology of Moroccan history, based on the various dynasties and religions that have affected Moroccan society with an emphasis on Islam.
  • Identify persons who have been influential on political, religious, and artistic life in the country.
  • Develop an expertise in an aspect of Moroccan culture, and articulate the significance of it during a group discussion.

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

FEES: Cost per student is $7,700. Fees include tuition, hotels with buffet breakfast each day, some meals, entrance fees to all museums and parks, air-conditioned bus, English speaking tour guides, and HTH International Health Insurance. Fees do not include: round-trip airfare to and from Morocco, extra curricular activities, baggage insurance, most meals, and tips to drivers and tour guides. A common itinerary will be developed for each student to facilitate group travel. Recommended amount of personal or spending money for the 3-week period is $800.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the competitive "Global Summer Fellowship Program," which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

DATES: May 5-30, 2014 (tentative)

SYLLABUS:  Morocco Maymester Itinerary 2013.pdf

CREDITS: 3 credit hours

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: sherif.barsoum@vanderbilt.edu

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SPANISH 202: SPANISH FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION THROUGH CULTURAL TOPICS

LECTURER: JOSÉ LUIS AZNAR, DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

This Maymester course is taught in Alicante, Spain. This gorgeous coastal city is the capital city of the beautiful Costa Blanca, located on the eastern coast of Spain. Few other cities can boast exciting and famous festivals, miles of beautiful sunny beaches, quaint, old- world Spanish boroughs, and a richness of early architecture. As a native of Spain, I cannot imagine a better and more exciting place to host this intermediate conversational Spanish course. In addition to the city of Alicante and Madrid, students will have the opportunity to visit Barcelona, Valencia and Granada.

The main objective of this class is to increase your Spanish level of oral proficiency through the study of Spanish cultural, political and historical events. As a conversation class, the students will be graded on several activities that will serve as catalysts to develop their oral proficiency. These activities will stimulate students to analyze, discuss and present different arguments from the material covered in class. Furthermore, in order to take advantage of the location of this course, students will be asked to interview Spaniards using information from a variety of authentic materials ranging from written news, radio and television broadcasts, documentaries, and feature films studied in class to prepare for their weekly presentations. By the end of this course, students should have greatly improved their oral proficiency, their knowledge about Spanish culture, and their strategies for effective oral communication.

VIDEO: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8113615/Maymester%20in%20Alicante%202010%20%2 81%29.mp4

DATES: May 5-30, 2014

FEES: Cost is $6,700. Included: course tuition, two-day visit in Madrid with entrance fees to sites and museums, transportation from Madrid /Alicante / Madrid, hotel room for 4 weeks, two meal/day plan in various restaurants, HTH International Health Insurance, and a Spanish cell phone (one per two students). Not included: airfare, optional side trips (Barcelona, Valencia & Granada), and activities (Dance & Sailing classes).
Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

For information about the competitive Global Summer Fellowship Program, offering scholarships to about 25 to 30 students at levels up to $8,500, consult the Global Education Office (GEO) at www.vanderbilt.edu/studyabroad.

ELIGIBILITY: Prerequisite: Span 201W. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. This course is listed as INT for AXLE credit.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: jose.aznar@vanderbilt.edu

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Spanish 204: Cultural Studies in the Andes (Cuzco, Machu Picchu and Lima)

Instructor: Heraldo Falconi

Spanish 204

As a cultural crossroad, UNESCO World Heritage Site, and cosmopolitan city, Cuzco has something for everyone. Make it your own during this Maymester and explore one of the most fascinating tourist destinations in the world: Cuzco, Peru.

In this course students will explore different forms of cultural production in the Hispanic world, with a focus on the Andean region and a strong emphasis on hands-on learning. Some of the issues discussed will be the lessons of cultural anthropology and archaeology to explore the past and understand the present, popular and elite artistic production, the importance of festive culture in the region, as well as questions of gender and society. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to engage in a more experiential type of tourism that will include activities such as hiking through ancient ruins, participating in important celebrations, and visiting with traditional artisans. Students will lodge and study in the historic center of Cuzco, thus encouraging constant interaction and exploration of all the former Inca capital has to offer. The group will spend the last few days in Lima, a major cosmopolitan city and culinary capital of the Americas.

Students will receive credit for Span 204: Hispanic Cultural Studies (Major: Culture/Elective; AXLE: INT; Prerequisite: Span 201W and Span 202.) Formal classes (taught in Spanish) will meet during the week and weekends will be dedicated to guided trips to Machu Picchu, the Sacred Valley of the Incas and Lima, among others.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Spanish 201W and Spanish 202. Also, students should be physically fit, as they will be expected to engage in hikes and walks at high altitude (around 12000 ft.)

FEES: Cost per student is $8700. Fees include tuition, class materials, lodging, at least one meal a day, entrance fees to all sites, as well as trips outside of Cuzco. Fees do not include airfare into Cuzco (May 8), Cuzco-Lima (May 24) or returning to the US (May 30.) Spending money will depend on personal habits but last year's students spent a few hundred dollars on average.

ITENERARY and travel arrangements for the group: Details to follow.

DATES. Arrival in Cuzco: May 8. Departure from Lima: May 30.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. This course is listed as INT for AXLE credit.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the competitive "Global Summer Fellowship Program," which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

Andean Studies Scholarship: There will be a maximum of two scholarships available to students participating in this Maymester. The amount is approximately $300, payable in local currency during the first week of classes. The application process consists of an interview and the submission of a 2-page statement (in Spanish) explaining the importance of this trip to Peru in the context of your own background, academic, and career goals. Please send all application materials and direct all questions to Prof. Heraldo Falconi (h.falconi@vanderbilt.edu.) The application deadline is February 15, 2014 and a final decision is expected by March 15.

MORE INFORMATION: Contact Heraldo Falconi (h.falconi@vanderbilt.edu)

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SPANish 205: The Way of Saint James.

Faculty: Maria Paz Pintané, DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH & PORTUGUESE

Spanish 205

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela has deeply influenced the spiritual and physical landscapes of Spain and has remained until today as a major heritage site. For this reason, this course explores, from a multidisciplinary point of view, the origins, development, and influence of The Way of Saint James in the life, and culture of Spain. Through a close examination of literature, art, history, cultural, and religious issues, we will learn how the cult of Saint James and The Way itself has contributed to shape Spanish national identity.

The program will take place in Spain during four weeks. The highlight of this course is a walking trip along several sections of the medieval French Way, specifically from Pamplona to Santo Domingo de la Calzada, and from Ponferrada to Santiago de Compostela. We will walk a total of 220 miles in 16 days. Additionally, we will visit several major Spanish cities relevant to the history of The Way (PAMPLONA, LOGROÑO, BURGOS, LEON, PONFERRADA, SANTIAGO, and A CORUNA). Also, we will spend two days in MADRID.

During the course, the trail of The Way will be the classroom where we will learn about the socio-historical, religious, and cultural significance of this medieval tradition. Also, they will attend talks in cathedrals, monasteries, castles, ancient pilgrim’s hospitals, and museums. Furthermore, we will immerse ourselves in a culinary experience that connects the food and culture of the north of Spain. As part of the course, students will write, in Spanish, a diary where they reflect about their experience and learnings. In addition, they will work on a group research project that will oblige them to interact with other pilgrims along The Way and with locals.

What is "El camino de Santiago"?
The "Camino de Santiago" is a pilgrimage journey to Santiago de Compostela, but also a unique road network that converges in the Galician city of Santiago de Compostela. According to the legend, the Apostle St. James’ remains were carried by boat from Jerusalem to northern Spain where they were buried on the site where nowadays sits the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. When the tomb was discovered, it started a stream of travelers making the pilgrimage to the site (the earliest records of visits date from the 8th century). Today, thousands of Christian and non-Christian pilgrims set out from their homes on their way to Santiago. Many of them for religious and spiritual reasons, but many others do it to enjoy a unique experience, which is the result of 12 centuries of existence. The Way of St. James has given rise to an extraordinary spiritual, cultural, and social life. For this reason, the main routes were declared the First European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe, and a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO.

FEES:Cost per student $7,500. Included: two-day visit to Madrid, one-day visit to Pamplona, two-day visit to Burgos, two-day visit to León, one-day vist to Ponferrada, two-day visit to Santiago, two-day visit to A Coruña. Transportation within Spain, housing/hotel for the whole trip, two meal plan (breakfast & dinner), HTH International Health Insurance, cultural visits (Madrid, Burgos, Leon, Astorga, Santiago & A Coruña), and classes. Not included: airfare & lunch.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

DATES: May 5th-June 1st.
Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

ELIGIBILITY: Prerequisite: Span 202. The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor. Student should be in good physical condition.

CREDITS: 3 credit hours.

MORE INFORMATION:
Website: VISIT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE TO SEE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM PREVIOUS COURSES: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vanderbilt-University-en-El-camino-de-Santiago/263978263648112?ref=hl

WATCH THIS SHORT VIDEO TO GET A CLOSER IDEA OF THE PLACES YOU WILL BE VISITING
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJr2FzPnn1A


E-mail: maria.p.pintane@vanderbilt.edu

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MHS 290: A Comparison of Healthcare Systems: The United States and La France

PROFESSOR: Nathalie Dieu-Porter

Latest World Health Organization’s statistical ranking of the world's health care systems:

This Maymester will incorporate a few days of in-class lectures and study at Vanderbilt University and Hospital, and 3 weeks of hands-on research, visits and lectures in Paris and in Aix-en-Provence, France.

A comparison of Healthcare Systems: the United States and La France
In 2000, health care experts for the World Health Organization tried to do a statistical ranking of the world's health care systems. They studied 191 countries and ranked them on things such as the number of years people lived in good health and whether everyone had access to good health care. France was ranked first. The United States ranked 37th.

Questions to explore:

  • Is the ranking flawed, as some researchers say?
  • Is the European healthcare system really ‘socialized’ medicine?
  • At half the cost of the American system, France offers universal care. How is that done?
  • What can the United States learn from a system that has worked since 1945?

Objectives:

  • Get a complete understanding of the French healthcare system: how does it work and how is it funded?
  • Study the history of the French healthcare system. Analysis of the public and private Hospital sectors in France with on-site visits.
  • Compare the US and the French health care systems.
  • Formulate a prognosis for the health care system in the US.

Special events and visits:

  • Conversations with health professionals such as medical doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dentists and physical therapists both in the United States and in France.
  • Visits of hospitals and healthcare facilities.
  • Guest lectures from professionals from the School of Public Health in Brussels. • Visit to “Médecins du Monde”.
  • Visit to the Curie Museum in Paris, Dermatology Cast Museum Visit at the Saint-Louis Hospital in Paris, etc.
  • Guided tour of the French Red Cross.
  • Conversations with hospital patients and locals.
  • Fun dinners and events!
  • Possibility of getting credit in French too.

ELIGIBILITY: The program is open to all majors with good academic standing, and with consent of instructor.
DATES: May 5-9 in Nashville (in class on campus and on hospital/caring facilities site visits) May 10-30 in France.

FEES: Cost per student is approximately $8,300. Fees include tuition, hotels with buffet breakfast each day, Metro pass in Paris, and TGV from Paris to Aix, some meals, and entrance fees to all museums and parks and HTH International Health Insurance. Fees do not include: roundtrip airfare to and from Paris, extra-curricular activities, baggage insurance, and some meals. A common itinerary will be developed for each student to facilitate group travel.

ITINERARY: The instructor will develop a common itinerary for students in this course. Students are responsible for their own airfare. Details to follow.

Fees and dates are subject to change. Course being offered is contingent upon enrolling at least 12 qualified students by the end of January.

Maymester students are eligible to apply for the competitive "Global Summer Fellowship Program," which provides scholarships of up to $8500 for 25-30 students. For more information, visit the GEO website at: https://webapp.mis.vanderbilt.edu/studioabroad/

CREDITS: 3 credit hours. No pre-requisite for this course. MHS-290 can count towards the French major/minor under "Intersections". This course has no AXLE credit.

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: nathalie.d.porter@Vanderbilt.Edu

 

Peabody educ 2690/3900: Zerrissenheit: Representation of Contemporary Germany in Popular Media

PROFESSORs: Melanie Hundley, Ph.D., Andrew L. Hostetler, Ph.D.

The German notion of “zerrissenheit,” or “torn-to-pieces-hood” provides a framework for this course and our examinations of Germany as a world power that has been torn apart and reconstructed. We will analyze, examine, and discuss representations using a lens of the unique development of Germany and German culture throughout the 20th and into the 21st century. Multiple representations of Germany in the form of fiction and non-fiction, primary source materials (i.e. letters, posters, political cartoons), secondary source materials (i.e. news articles), documentary films, and cinema will provide texts for students to explore as they apply their learning through textual analysis and physical experience to demonstrate a deep understanding of the complexity of society and culture.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course explores essential concepts re power, space, place and representation with respect to culture and nation that are of interest to students in various studies, both pure and applied. Through intentional and intense study of representations of Germany in the 20th and 21st centuries we will consider the formation, tearing apart, and reconstruction of Germany as a culture and country with implications for identity, foreign policy, and interpretations of representation institutions, people and places through literature and media as text.

You will be able to…

  1. Analyze a variety of art, media and narrative representations of Germany across time periods
  2. Interpret representations across media in order to determine how cultural narratives get shaped and reshaped
  3. Discuss, in both oral and written formats, the ways in which internal and external perspectives on culture and identity change over time
  4. Demonstrate disciplinary competency in analysis, interpretations, and articulation with clear implications for practices within your field of study.


ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

  1. In what ways has German life, politics and culture in the last century been marked by "zerrissenheit"?
  2. How have space and place been implicated in and shaped Germany's torn-to-pieces-hood? And what have been the implications for the exercise of power for Germans as individuals and as a nation?
  3. How has the German culture and polity come to be represented?  How have those representations been created and maintained?


COURSE READINGS

Note: Readings may replace those listed or be removed from our reading assignments based on our needs and class discussion.

Cohen, R. (2013). Germany’s conspicuous silence. New York Times, September 9, 2013. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/opinion/cohen-germanys-conspicuous-silence.html?emc=eta1&_r=0&pagewanted=print.

Cresswell, T. (2010). Towards a politics of mobility. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 28(1), 17-31.

Hall, S. (1997). Representation: Cultural representations and signifying practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Helfenbein, R. (2011). The urbanization of everything: Thoughts on globalization and education. In S. Tozer, B. P. Gallegos, A. M. Henry, M. B. Greiner, and P. G. Price (Eds.) The handbook of research in the social foundations of education, (pp. 319-326). New York, NY: Routledge.

Hubbard, J. D., & Maloley, K. L. (2013). Teaching a balanced view of Germany to K-6 teacher candidates: Dispelling negative stereotypes and internationalizing the curriculum. The Journal of Social Studies Research, 37(4), 209-219.

Hubbard, P., & Kitchin, R. (2011). Key thinkers on space and place (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Chapter 37 & 51.

Ladd, B. (1997). The ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German history in the urban landscape. University of Chicago Press.

Massey, D. (1991). A global sense of place. Marxism today, 35(6), 24-29. Retrieved from http://www.aughty.org/pdf/global_sense_place.pdf

Books
Matthews, J. A., & Herbert, D. T. (2008). Geography: A very short introduction. Oxford, England:  Oxford University Press.

Wiessell, E. (1960). Night. New York, NY: Bantam Books.

Graphic Novel
Speigleman, A. (1986). Maus. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc.

Movies
Percival, B. (Director). (2013). The book thief. United States: Fox 2000 Pictures.

Documentary
Legendary Sin Cities: Berlin – (http://trutube.tv/video/1224/Legendary-Sin-Cities-Berlin)  

Several Primary and Secondary Source Materials
Propaganda posters from WWI, WWII, and Cold War eras’ historical phenomena (i.e. War bonds, Cuban Embargo, Recruitment, etc.)

Letters from and between leaders of nations (i.e. Churchill, FDR)

News articles from the era of the historical phenomena to discuss and discern between perspectives


COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTIONS

  • Writing Assignment – Space and Place (Nashville & Berlin/Munich)
    DUE          Week 1 & Week 3
    Week 1: Choose an iconic site in Nashville.  Discuss the narrative about Nashville that this site helps construct.  Consider what you have learned about space and place as you write. (See assignment sheet for specific directions.)
    Week 2: Choose an iconic site in Berlin.  Discuss the narrative about Berlin/Germany that this site helps construct.  Consider the sites you have seen in Berlin, Dresden, and Munich as you write.  (See assignment sheet for specific directions.)
  • Ongoing Journal—Readings and Field Notes                             
    DUE Week 4       
    This journal is going to be an ongoing reflection of your learning based on your readings, artwork, experiences in Germany, and guiding questions for the course.  You will respond to your readings in a variety of ways, gather images and responses to documentaries and field trips, and make sense of your developing understanding of zerissinheit as it relates to the construction/reconstruction of Germany.
  • Visual and Textual Representations of Learning                                    
    DUE Week 5
    You will use your journal as a resource to construct a final project that represents your understanding of zerissinheit, German culture, and cultural representations (people, cities, countries).  You will consider what you know about space, place, power, scale, and representation as you construct your argument.  Your argument will include image and text and will be supported by your readings and your field experiences.
  • Citizenship
    As a student you are expected to attend class and be prepared. This means being on time, having read and completed all assignments for that day. If unexpected or emergency circumstances prevent you from attending a class session or completing work on time you are expected to handle these situations professionally. You may contact us via email, or phone, at the earliest possible opportunity. Failure to attend class, submit assignments on time, or meet the expectation of dealing with these matters professionally may result in lowering your course grade (for attendance), or assignment grade (for late assignments), up to one letter.

ELIGIBILITY:

FEES:

ITINERARY:

Perliminary itenerary
Fly to Berlin: 6/8
Berlin 6/9-6/15
Travel by Train to Dresden: 6/16
Dresden: 6/16-6/18
Travel by Train to Munich: 6/19
Munich: 6/19-6/21
Travel by Train to Berlin—6/22
Fly home from Berlin—6/22

SYLLABUS: GermanyIdentityCulture-Syllabus 2014.pdf PDF

CREDITS:

MORE INFORMATION: E-mail: melanie.hundley@vanderbilt.edu or a.hostetler@vanderbilt.edu


 

 

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