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Digital initiative in world literatures and cultures

Todd Hughes' talk on Digital Humanities

TEI/XML Working Group

Are you interested in learning how to do a computational analysis of a text?  It's a two part process.  First, you need to put your text in format that a computer can read.  Once it is in that format, you can query and analyze it through technology.  The first part of the process is called TEI.  The second part of the process is called XQuery.  In the TEI/XML Working group, we are busy preparing Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal  for future analysis.  This is a very easy process, but you will need some training.  Once you learn how to do this, you can cin teaching literary works to your students?  Are you interested in creating detailed maps in order to look at literary works from a different point of view?  In the Geospatial Tools Working group, we explore the ways in which digital maps can inform us about literary texts.  We also learn how to create digital maps.  We work with tools such as Mapbox.com, html and geojson.  These tools are very easy to use and learn.  For further information regarding meeting times, locations and what to expect at the meeting, click the link above. 

Geospatial Tools Working Group 

Are you interested in creating online maps for use in teaching literary works to your students?  Are you interested in creating detailed maps in order to look at literary works from a different point of view?  In the Geospatial Tools Working group, we explore the ways in which digital maps can inform us about literary texts.  We also learn how to create digital maps.  We work with tools such as Mapbox.com, html and geojson.  These tools are very easy to use and learn.  For further information regarding meeting times, locations and what to expect at the meeting, click the link above.   Want to learn a little bit more about Geospatial tools?  Look at an example.  Click on the different tabs to learn about each location.

Digital 3-D Visualization Working Group

3-D models are very helpful, not only in your teaching, but also in your research.  For example, it is impossible for students to understand the size and structure of the Arc de Triomphe, by looking at a two-dimensional picture.  In this group, we are actually creating three-dimensional models for teaching and research purposes.  We are also interested in inserting these three-dimensional models into computer games.  A typical session will include a discussion of three-dimensional models, and some practical training in aspects of creating models.  We are presently using Blender as our software of choice.  The learning curve is steep and we go very slowly.  For further information regarding meeting times, locations and what to expect at the meeting, click the link above. You could learn to create something like this!

Data Visualization Working Group

Are you interested in considering learning how to create graphs, charts and diagrams in order to demonstrate literary and textual phenomena?  In the Data Visualization Working Group, we use software, such as Gephi, in order to visualize textual concepts such as narrative and discourse.  We also use software to visualize extra-textual events, for example, the movement of letters between authors.  Activities include a discussion of the conceptual dimensions of the visualization and training in use of visualization software.   For further information regarding meeting times, locations and what to expect at the meeting, click the link above.   Do you want to know what this looks like?  Look at an  example .  Click on the different go button to see some visualizations related to Voltaire.  For further information regarding meeting times, locations and what to expect at the meeting, click the link above. 

 

  Additional Opportunities for developing skills in using digital tools are available through the Office of Scholarly Communications in the Library.

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