News & Events

Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Award recipient for 2016: Vibhuti Krishna

Vanderbilt University Department of Art is pleased to announce the recipient of the prestigious Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet award for 2016. This year’s recipient is Vibhuti Krishna, Solon, OH. As a Hamblet winner, she will receive a $25,000 prize that provides the funds for a year of art research and travel, culminating her solo show at Vanderbilt in one year.

Vibhuti work explores the “In Sanskirt, prana means life-force, with specific respect to breath. It is concepetually analogous to qi in Ancient China, or penuma in Ancient Greece. Wellness in “traditional medicine”, a term that applies to pre-scientific forms of medicine, is inextricably linked with a balanced life force that flows through the body. Wellness is achieved through meditative, ritualistic practice, and beginning to resurface as an integrative approach to health.

The $10,000 Merit Award was presented to Lucy Rahner, Cincinnati, OH.

Lucy’s artwork is am to make people feel human and experience the full reality of their existence. The work will communicate the transcendental elements of truth, beauty, and goodness, while also respecting the way humans are grounded in a material world. The idea of “sacramentality” permetes her work-that is, the notion of material things expressing unseen realities.

Senior Show 2016 is on display Monday through Friday from 9 to 4 until May 10. The gallery is located in the E. Bronson Ingram Studio Art Center, 25th and Garland on the Vanderbilt University campus.

The other graduating art majors exhibiting include: David Brandon, III, Jeffrey Gao, Lucy Gonzalez, Jacob Lee, Michael Oberti, Julie Choi, Morgan Pinkleton, Lisa Valcarenghi and Diana Zhu.

Jurors selected to serve for the competition are all distinguished artists and educators. Jurors this year included Lisa Bukawsky, Professor of Art, Sam Fox School of Design & Visusal Arts, Washington University in St. Louis; Soo Sunny Park, Chair of Studio Art Department, Dartmouth College , Hanover, NH and Greg Pond, Professor of Art, Department Chair, Sewanee the University of the South, Sewanee, TN

The Department of Art has supervised the awarding of the Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Award since 1984. The award was established by Clement H. Hamblet in honor of his wife, whom he met while she was studying abroad. The Hamblet Award is meant to provide the means for travel and independent art activity for one year, culminating in an exhibition at Vanderbilt.

 

The Senior Show 2016 and Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Award Competition

 

Juror Artist Talks: April 14, 2016

 

Meggan Gould: A Failure to See, April 12, 2016

 

David Krenz's Ink Indefinitie Opening Faburary 4, 2016 in Space 204

Ink Indefinite is a series of sculptural works based on the Turritopsis dohrnii species of jellyfish, commonly known as the “Immortal Jellyfish”. These Jellyfish can reverse their biotic cycle from their fully mature form to their polyp stage using a unique process that cannot be found elsewhere in the entire animal kingdom.  This continual cycle of deterioration and regeneration can theoretically allow a jellyfish in this species to bypass death indefinitely.

Ink Indefinite asks the question, “What would it be like to be trapped in an endless cycle of life and death?” The series displays several interpretations of the immortal jellyfish drawing inspiration from forms such as embryos, eggs, squids, birds, and ghosts.  This series continues upon themes prevalent in David Krenz’s previous works - including altered states of physical and psychological existence, consciousness, and the ethereal.

David Krenz, recipient of the Margaret Stonewall Wooldridge Hamblet Award in 2014, graduated from Vanderbilt University with a double major in studio art and music - both of which played a heavy hand in his senior show piece, “World of Sleepers”. While historically working in photography or video, David has recently discovered an interest in contemporary sculpture exhibitions. Since relocating to Los Angeles, he has had the opportunity to meet a manifold of contemporary sculpture artists and visited numerous design shows and conventions, serving as the springboard for his present work.

In the coming years, David plans to continue in his art endeavors - including artistic collaborations with other Vanderbilt graduates, and seeking admission in interactive media MFA programs in California.

 

Studio VU: Mahwish Chishty, February 10, 2016

Initially trained as a miniature painter from the National College of Arts, Lahore, Pakistan, Mahwish Chishty has aggressively combined new media and conceptual work with her traditional practice. Ms. Chishty has exhibited her work nationally and internationally at venues like University of Technology (UTS Gallery) Sydney, Australia; Boghossian Foundation– Villa Empain. Brussels; Utah Museum of Contemporary Art; Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MOCADA), Brooklyn, NY; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI and Gandhara Art Gallery, Karachi, Pakistan among others. By camouflaging modern war machines with folk imagery, Ms. Chishty is shedding light on the complexity of acculturation, politics and power.

In 2015, Ms. Chishty was awarded residencies at the Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL; Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, NY; and Vermont Studio Center, Vermont, NY. Ms. Chishty also has works in public and private collections including the Foreign office Islamabad, Pakistan and Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Fukuoka Shi, Japan.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: The Department of Art at 615-343-7241 or martha.l.dale@vanderbit.edu

 

Studio VU: Regina Agu Lecture January 20, 2016

Regina Agu's work explores the intersection of memory and history. She is interested in the production, performance, and archiving of historical narratives, personal memory, and collective memory. She works across disciplines both individually and collaboratively on subjects such as: diasporic subjectivity at the intersection of collective and personal history; public policies as they govern and regulate communities of color; choreographies and sites of mass congregation and demonstration; and residual traces of hidden or suppressed narratives.

Agu's work has been included in exhibitions, public readings, and performances at New Museum, labotanica, DiverseWorks, Project Row Houses, University Museum at Texas Southern University, Box 13, and Lawndale Arts Center, among other venues. Her published experimental texts include ON IOFF (onestar press, Paris, France via Book Machine, Houston), Visible Unseen (Nyx, a nocturnal, Goldsmiths, University of London), and Index, With and for: "Black Mo'nin'," by Fred Moten (Book Club Book, Future Plan and Program). She is a partner at Alabama Song, a collaboratively-run artist space in Houston, TX, and a co-founder of paratext, an independent small press.

All lectures are free and open to the public. Parking is available in the lots to the side of E. Bronson Studio Arts Center as well as the parking lot access the street on 25st Avenue and the parking garage via the Highland Ave entrance.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: The Department of Art at 615-343-7241 or martha.l.dale@vanderbit.edu

 

2016 College Book Art Association Juried Members’ Exhibition, Backstory: Exploring the Boundaries of the Book

College Book Art Association members were asked to submit works that explored the boundaries of the book using a wide interpretation, including artist’s books, sculptural books, book objects, altered books, book installations, performance, broadsides or book works that involve digital media. Submitted works should also possess an interesting backstory: a tale of inspiration, a simultaneous narrative, or story behind production.

Jurors, Susan Lowdermilk and Tate Shaw, selected works using a blind jurying process. They considered an incredible number of submissions—165 in all—and had the unenviable task of selecting only 30 from among some really fine pieces.

This group of 165 book works is a wonderful representation of contemporary American artist’s books. –Susan Lowdermilk, Professor at Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon. Lowdermilk has been teaching courses in printmaking, artist books and graphic design for twenty years.

The works we selected all appear to have two things in common: they have a subject beyond just being intricate objects and they attempt to investigate concerns we share publicly by addressing these issues through intimate and personal objects. I was most surprised and impressed by the student books submitted. Several of the students are endeavoring to get beyond one-liners in favor of creating complex works that require being read while also engaging larger socio-political subjects. This gives me some hope for the field and is perhaps evidence that our book educators and programs are working. –Tate Shaw, artist and writer living in Rochester, NY. Shaw is the Director of Visual Studies Workshop and an Assistant Professor in English at the College at Brockport, SUNY.

The College Book Art Association is a non-profit organization fundamentally committed to the teaching of book arts at the college and university level, while supporting such education at all levels, concerned with both the practice and the analysis of the medium. It welcomes as members everyone involved in such teaching and all others who have similar goals and interests. The association aims to engage in a continuing reappraisal of the nature and meaning of the teaching of book arts.

Adrienne Miller's Middleground Opening November 5, 2015 in Space 204

Vanderbilt’s Department of Art is pleased to welcome an exhibition by Adrienne Miller into Space 204. Middleground will be on display from Thursday, November 19, to Sunday, November 22, from 10am to 4pm. A closing reception will be held Thursday, November 19, from 4 to 6pm at Space 204, E. Bronson Ingram Studio Art Center in Room 204. An artist talk will be Thursday, November 19 at 11:00am in Room 220.

Primarily focusing on works on paper, Adrienne Miller’s recent studio practice explores using symbolic landscapes to reflect ​on the psychology of our daily thoughts and interactions.

After graduating from Murray State University in 2007 with her BFA in Studio Art, she found her way from Kentucky to Nashville as a summer intern for H​atch Show Print​, a world famous, 130+ year old letterpress shop. While still living in Tennessee, Adrienne spent 5 years working as the Studio Manager and Gallery Coordinator for Vanderbilt University's Department of Art. She has also served an exhibitions assistant for the Northern Illinois University Art Museum, as a summer staff intern at ​Spudnik Press​, as the printmaking curator for the 2014 Chicago Printer’s Ball and as a workshop assistant for the 2014 Frogman's Print and Paper Workshop.​

Adrienne graduated with her MFA in Printmaking from Northern Illinois University in 2015. She teaches drawing and printmaking classes and is currently an Assistant Preparator at the Speed Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. Her studio work has been exhibited across the U.S. and abroad.

 

John Warren's Phantom Engineer Opening Septmeber 24, 2015 in Space 204

Vanderbilt’s Department of Art is pleased to welcome an exhibition by faculty member John Warren into Space 204.  Phantom Engineer will be on display from September 24 - October 29, 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A reception will be held Thursday, October 1, from 4 to 6 pm with gallery talk at 5:00 pm

Space 204 is sponsored by the Department of Art and is located on the second floor of the E. Bronson Ingram Studio Art Center, 25th and Garland, on the Vanderbilt campus. All exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Phantom Engineer is a cine-installation that employs three prominently visible projectors, each with a loop of 16mm film, to construct a meditation on Nashville’s role as a hub for commerce. The piece is also a reflection on the deep nature of film, of substance, of luminosity and shadow. Ghostly images of semi-transparent trains endlessly flicker across the gallery wall. The abstracted movement within the frame complicates the representational landscape of industrial Nashville.
"A spirit of inquiry drives my work as an artist. How does the spectral appearance of the trains bring them alive in a way that replaces romanticism with mystery? How does this way of looking allow us to simultaneously contemplate Nashville’s past and present at a time when the city is experiencing rapid growth and moving into an uncertain future?”

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: The Department of Art at 615-343-7241 or martha.l.dale@vanderbit.edu

 



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